Carla Jean Lauter

The Beer Babe

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Rolling on the River

Published in the March 2016 issue of The Bollard


The inspiration to build a brewery commonly strikes while people are drinking beer. In the case of Dirigo Brewing Company, the seeds of partnership and possibility presented themselves during an appointment for a new set of tires.

Last year, Mark Paulin, owner of Paulin’s Tire & Auto Care, struck up a conversation with a customer at his Forest Avenue location. Her name is Molly Bull, and when Paulin learned that her husband, Tom Bull, was the former brewer and co-owner of Bull Jagger Brewing Company, his interest was piqued.

Tom Bull started homebrewing with his father at age 19. His brewing career technically began when he got a job as a bouncer at Gritty’s, eventually landing a position in the brewpub’s brewery. Stints at the now long-shuttered Stone Coast Brewing Co. and at Casco Bay Brewing Co. (before it was acquired by Shipyard) followed. In 2011, Bull launched Bull Jagger Brewing Company with business partner Allan Jagger.

Bull Jagger was the first and only Maine brewery to exclusively brew lagers. The flagship beer was Portland Lager, a fruity and crisp brew made in the Helles style. It soon attracted a sizeable local following. Unfortunately, that business partnership didn’t last long, and the 7.5 barrel brewery closed in early 2013. Not long afterward, however, state laws governing the operation of brewery tasting rooms were loosened, giving rise to Maine’s thriving tasting-room scene.

Mark Paulin and Tom Bull, with the help of their significant others, plan to make Dirigo Brewing Company a big addition to that scene this spring. Their 15 barrel brewhouse, with over 100 barrels of fermentation capacity, is taking shape inside an old mill in Biddeford. Dirigo will join a small cluster of breweries in the Biddeford-Saco area, which includes Banded Horn, Barreled Souls, and the Run of the Mill brewpub.

Dirigo’s tasting room will be over 2,000 square feet, with big windows that provide stunning views of the Saco River and historic mill buildings nearby. Tasters and growler-fills will be available on premise, and draughts will be distributed across the state.

Paulin wants the tasting room to appeal to all types of people. “If you’re a business person and you want to go talk over a deal, I want this to be the kind of place where someone says, ‘You know Dirigo? It’s got a cool vibe, let’s go talk down there.’ But I also want the hard-hat guy to come in and say, ‘This is my kind of place.’”

The new brewery’s line-up will be lager-centric, but not exclusively so. Bull said he plans to bring back some of the beers he brewed at Bull Jagger, in addition to other styles, including a few ales.

What’s the difference between brewing an ale and a lager? Bull has a one-word answer: “Patience.”

Lagers, which are fermented at colder temperatures, take significantly longer to make. Ales can be brewed in as little as two weeks, whereas lagers can take up to two months before they’re ready. That’s why Dirigo has so much fermentation capacity — to ensure they have the space (and the time) for the lagers to fully develop.

The spectrum of lagers goes far beyond the pilsners and Budweiser-style brews most folks know. “There’s a whole world beyond the pale yellow, fizzy lager that we all think of,” said Bull. “It stretches the gamut of colors, tastes, flavors and textures.” Dirigo Brewing Company’s offerings will include a familiar Helles lager, but also a Martzen, a crimson-colored festbier, and a Baltic Porter.

The options for good, locally produced lagers have grown in the three years since Bull Jagger closed, but there’s still plenty of room (and demand) in the market for variations on the style. Bull, who drove a cab for a while after Bull Jagger’s demise, always knew he’d get back in the brewing business. “Once it’s in your blood, it’s in your blood,” he said.

48 Hours in Portland Maine

 All About Beer MagazineVolume 36, Issue 6

Despite being the historic home of Neal Dow, the father of the Prohibition statute known as The Maine Law, Portland, Maine, is far from being dry today. There are now nearly a dozen breweries in the immediate Portland area, and over 60 statewide. Beers from breweries spread across the state can often be found on tap somewhere in Portland—saving lots of additional travel to the more far-flung corners of the state. The city of Portland has its own airport and is also easily accessible by bus and rail from Boston—making it an ideal spot for a weekend beer visit. [Read more on All About Beer.com]

A few notes on this article since it went to print:

  • Austin Street Brewery is not as tiny
  • Rising Tide Brewing Co. has a newly expanded tasting room
  • Bissell Brothers has moved to a new location at Thompson’s Point
  • Foundation Brewing plans to expand into the former Bissell Brothers space
  • Urban Farm Fermentory is now brewing beer (gruit) in addition to ciders, kombucha.
  • A new brewery, Lone Pine Brewing Company,  has joined the yEast Bayside neighborhood.

That’s the pace of the changes around here! Cheers!

Death by a Thousand Cups

A bartender’s hand slips off a freshly washed pint glass that falls to the floor with a crash. The sound of its destruction triggers cringes from patrons, some uttering small groans of disapproval. The expense of replacing a pint glass is negligible, folded into the overhead costs of running the drinking establishment. Unless an employee is exceptionally uncoordinated, such accidents don’t noticeably diminish the bar’s glassware inventory.

Across town, the employee of a small brewery takes stock before opening the tasting room to the weekend rush of beer enthusiasts and their friends. The racks of clean glasses seem sparser than they were last week. Or the week before that. Or the week before that week.

The cause here isn’t a careless bartender or busser. It is, literally, thieves.

Many operators of the small brewery tasting rooms that have popped up across Maine in the past year or two face the same questions after every busy weekend: How many tasting glasses are left, and when will we need to order more? The more popular the brewery, the more likely they are to fall victim of this type of petty crime.

The cumulative financial impact has compelled some brewers to attempt to police their tasting rooms, a task they are, understandably, reluctant to do.

“We have to spend more time than we’d like looking after taster glasses,” Jake Austin, of Austin Street Brewery, told me. “That’s time that could be spent talking to people about our beer and our brewery.”

Most of the affected breweries that have branded tasting glasses also offer those glasses for sale, often for only a few dollars. So why does this thievery continue week after week?

Maybe it’s because the glasses are tiny and pretty. Maybe the tasting room guests are trying to look cool in front of their friends by pulling off a mildly daring heist. Perhaps they’re so entitled as to believe that because they paid for a beer, the glass should be theirs when they finish it. Or maybe the small samples they’ve consumed have simply eroded their already weak impulse control.

There are actions that can be taken to make glassware less attractive to thieves, and several Maine breweries have taken those steps. Breweries can use unbranded glassware, ask patrons for a taster-glass deposit, or switch to plastic cups on busy days (please, don’t). They can invest in security cameras, post scolding signs, or spend more time monitoring patrons. But all those measures have drawbacks — they’re a hassle, an expense, or both. Switching to unbranded glassware robs breweries of opportunities to promote their brand via social media — all those photos of your pals hoisting tasters on Facebook and Instagram.

Unfortunately, glassware isn’t the only thing snatched from local tasting rooms. Posters, artwork, flight boxes, tasting paddles, and even a potted plant have all walked away from brewery tasting rooms in recent months. This indicates a more general attitude of entitlement that, as with glassware theft, ultimately leads to higher costs for everyone.

Instead of expecting our breweries to invest time, money and staff for extra security, let’s join together in an effort to raise awareness of this problem and help to self-police it. I believe we can change this culture of entitlement if we try hard enough. The pilfering of one taster glass obviously won’t be the ruin of any single brewery, but the collective kleptomania will lead to higher prices and a less convivial atmosphere for all.

Go to Austin Street Brewery and order a taster glass of Patina Pale Ale. Go to Rising Tide and get a flight of four beers served in their wooden tasting box. Go to Foundation Brewing Company and look at the little outline of the state of Maine on the back of your sample of Forge.

If, while enjoying your samples, you see someone trying to steal something, call them out on it. Maybe give them a nasty glare, or mutter a quick, disapproving “Dude” (which is also effective on women). And when you’re done, bring your tasting glass back to the employee at the taps — because it’s the right thing to do.

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