10 Questions for Female Beer Drinkers

I found this post from Ginger at Women Enjoying Beer (great site by the way!) and thought I’d share the questions and my responses. Feel free to copy these questions and post your own answers in the comments!

Women: Time to play a round of What Do You Want From Your Beer? If compelled, please respond to these 10 questions (via email ginger (at) womenenjoyingbeer.com Thanks in advance – it’s viral too). Responding while sipping = good!

1. Why do you drink beer?
I drink beer because I enjoy the taste of most beer styles, I can never get bored with it and often it goes well with the food I am eating. I choose beer over other beverages because it is so dynamic in flavor that it fits whatever mood I’m in.

2. Why do you like beer?
Beer just has such an infinite spectrum of flavors, that it suits the seasons, my particular cravings and whims with ease. Also with the proliferation of craft breweries, I will never come CLOSE to getting bored with trying what they come up with.

3. What kinds of beers do you like?
Depends on the day/hour but right now I’m on a bit of a Saison kick. I do like hops, I do like dark beer, I do like sour beer, I do like spiced/fruit beer and everything in between. About the only few styles I don’t love are Brown ales and some English styles – but mostly because they’re just not flavorful enough and I find them a little boring.

4. What would compel you to try a beer you haven’t tried before?
A friend’s recommendation, the beer’s description/style, an interesting story on the label, a brewer/store providing an opportunity to try it.

5. What do you want from your beer?
A taste that I like, quality that is consistent. Bonuses for me are things that are made locally or regionally, that are transparent about their processes and ingredients, and are independent.

6. Conversely, what don’t you want from your beer?
I don’t want beer that is tasteless or thin on purpose, nor do I support the use of substitute adjuncts such as corn or rice used to make larger (macro) beer. I do not want to know how many calories are in any of my beer. Ever. I am drinking it for the experience, not as part of a diet plan. Also, beer that’s been properly stored is always good because the last thing I want is any off flavors from brewing or improper storage. I also don’t want beer served to me in a frosted glass. I get so disappointed when I order a great ale and it comes to me with a layer of ice on top where the head should be.

7. What kind of beer education or social beer opportunities would you like to take advantage of?
I have gone to the last two beer blogger’s conferences and learned an immense amount of information. I hope to do that again. I would also like to have an opportunity to “shadow” a craft brewer and really get a sense of what it’s like to be a brewer at a craft brewery.

8. How do you want the beer companies to address/acknowledge you as a female beer drinker?
1 – Stop attempting to market directly to me (women) using color/style (i.e., pinkification), calories, lightness, or intentional tastelessness. I would rather have them NOT acknowledge me at all than to treat me like I am an idot that will drink anything pink, fruity or under 100 calories.
2- Stop perpetuating and the stereotypical image(s) of women SERVING beer to men, instead of drinking and enjoying it themselves. They don’t have to feminize their branding, just make it more gender neutral!
3 – Help to normalize the craft-beer drinking woman’s image by including imagry of normal women enjoying craft beer in brewery PR materials (ads, websites, etc.)
4 – If a brewery is really set on marking to women, make an ad with an intelligent woman describing that she loves the beer she’s drinking because of its taste characteristics and that she proudly chooses craft beer after a long day of work as a CEO. With no sexual innuendo. Not to be a cynic, but I think it is so incredibly unlikely that I think I may fall off my chair if I ever actually see an ad like this…

9. What kind of atmosphere do you prefer when you drink beer?
Anywhere with other people that are talking about what they’re drinking – that can be at a friend’s apartment, at a bar, at a restaurant, at a beer festival, whatever. Drinking alone is boring, and so is drinking exactly the same thing as everyone else. Discussion and variety is what makes craft beer drinking fun!

10. What do you think about present beer marketing and advertising as it relates to you as a woman?
See #7 for more detail, but I think the fundamental problem is two fold. First, the current beer marketing out there is blatantly using women as servers of beer and as sexual objects to sell beer, which will never entice a woman to drink it, and is perpetuating several negative stereotypes about female intelligence. Secondly, advertising directed only at women is incredibly misguided. I will not drink a beer because it is pink and uses CurlsMT font on the label. I will not choose a beer based on how many calories it has, or that it will make me “less gassy” (I’ve seen that…) or “not fill me up.” And somehow, even though thousands of women feel the same way, advertisers and branding gurus still reach back into the 1950s for wisdom about how to market goods to women. Its maddening.

10. Does size matter for your beer?
I can drink a typical bottled beer with no problem, though I do choose the smaller size at restaurants that offer “tall” (often 24 oz) and a “pint” sized beer. Half of the reason for that is that I rarely order two of the same beer in a row, so if I get done with one pint, I will very likely choose a different beer if I have a second. I also love to take 750ml bottles to friends’ houses to split/share it with them, but could also curl up with a bomber bottle for a long night in. So, size doesn’t really matter, it just depends on the situation and the company. I have no desire, however, to drink a “40″ of crappy beer. ;)

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